Archive for May, 2008

Interview: James Murray and Andy Ovsejevich

Monday, May 12th, 2008

James Murray and Andy OvsejevichTwelve years have passed since the opening night of Jonathan Larson’s musical Rent at the New York Theater Workshop in 1996. After twelve years of success and awards, one of the longest running musicals on Broadway has now premiered in Buenos Aires. The venue couldn’t have been a better choice: Ciudad Cultural Konex, a former oil factory turned into a cultural center in the heart of the Abasto neighborhood, where famous tango singer Carlos Gardel spent part of his childhood.

Director James Murray and producer and executive director Andy Ovsejevich talked with KadmusArts about how and why they decided to produce the musical in Buenos Aires, what the creation process was like, and how they dealt with the translation and adaptation of the script and lyrics. In closing, they shared with us an upcoming production at Konex: Puccini’s opera, La Boheme.

Cast Photos from the Ciudad Cultural Konex Production of Rent:

Rent Cast
Rent - Mark
Rent - Roger and Mimi

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Get Smart

Monday, May 5th, 2008

Photo by Kenneth Lu — Creative Commons License Some Rights Reserved

Wired magazine has created a twelve-step program that makes you smarter.

While the regular audience for Wired might approach this program from a techie point of view, we have a much better path towards intellectual enlightenment and accomplishment.

For this twelve step program, you don’t have to be shamed into action. Here’s the hook: If you go to festivals, you will have fun, and each of the twelve steps is made easy.

Here are Wired’s twelve steps to think about, and KadmusArts’ twelve steps to take:

1. Distract Yourself

Your ability to remember works better when you take your mind off the task.
What better way to distract yourself from your daily grind than to go to any festival in the world?

2. Caffeinate with Care

Java science shows that frequent small doses are better than a few large ones.
Did you know that there are festivals that boast coffee drinking as a perk? (Pun intended.)

3. Choose Impressive Information

The goal is to feed your mind.
A helpful step is the Pick of the Week, be it cool classical, dynamic dance, terrific theatre, or just outdoor wild rock ‘n roll.

4. Think Positive

If you approach new learning with a positive attitude you will learn better.
So, you must positively go to New Work.

5. Do the Right Drugs

How smart is this: don’t listen to anyone but a doctor.
Read about the art of stimulation.

6. Juice Your IQ Score

The more you test yourself, the better you do on tests.
Fortunately, there are festivals that test, too.

7. Know Your Brain

Amygdala, Cortex, Hippocampus, Hyphothalamus, and Thalamus”¦
“¦these are not just heavy metal bands.

8. Don’t Panic

The more relaxed you are, the better you think and react in tense situations.
Perfect opportunities to relax are produced by classical music fests.

9. Embrace Chaos

A good mind — and life — comes from a willingness to mix it up.
There are music festivals that give you a mix of all kinds of sounds and styles.

10. Get Visual

Use your imagination to see a problem, or situation, in parts.
New ways of seeing are part and parcel of theatre festivals.

11. Exercise Wisely

No surprise here: a fit mind is helped by a fit body.
Get inspired by some of the fittest bodies, and best minds, at dance festivals.

12. Slow Down

When you slow down, you see, read, and perceive better. You also won’t take life too seriously.
Make the time to travel, see live entertainment, and be part of the culture of your community and our world.

Don’t you feel smarter already? So, where are you going to go now?

- Bill Reichblum

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Arts Presenters: Margaret Lawrence

Monday, May 5th, 2008

Margaret LawrenceMargaret Lawrence is the Director of Programming at the Hopkins Center for the Arts at Dartmouth College. The “Hop” presents each year 100 or more live performances in music, theater and dance, plus well over 200 film screenings and other events. Most recently, Class Divide, a three-year programming initiative, seeks to examine the issue of class through the arts.

In this interview, Margaret talks about the multiple roles that the Hopkins Center plays within the local community, how to forge relationships with artists, and the whys and hows of commissioning new works.

This interview is part of an ongoing series with the Association of Performing Arts Presenters.

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