Archive for April, 2007

Interview: Hernán Román (in Spanish)

Wednesday, April 11th, 2007

Photo: Hernan RomanHernán Román es el Director General del Festival Internacional de Ushuaia y fundador de Festspiele SRL, empresa productora de este encuentro de música clásica — el festival más austral del mundo, que se lleva a cabo desde el año 2005 en la ciudad de Ushuaia, Provincia de Tierra del Fuego. Para esta edición 2007 el festival formará parte del programa del Año Polar Internacional, junto con la Bienal del Fin del Mundo.

Hernán nos cuenta sobre la importancia de crear una buena marca e imagen para posicionar el festival, y sobre el programa de esta tercera edición, cuya orquesta base será la Sinfónica de Berlín, que el 11 de abril inaugurará el festival con un concierto en el Teatro Coliseo de Buenos Aires.

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Passionate Performance/Performing Passion

Monday, April 9th, 2007


Photo by Brian Tobin — Creative Commons License Some Rights Reserved

Culture — religious, national, or artistic — is built from shared stories, mythologies, beliefs, and rituals. The culture is transmitted through the re-telling, or performance, of these ideas and actions.

A village in the Philippines is becoming an international destination for its rather special way of retelling The Passion. Reuters has the video story from the village where, in honor of Good Friday, several villagers volunteer to be crucified.

The event grows each year from its rather unique environment that combines determined religious faith, performance-art festival, and a tourist attraction.

The event has more to it than the intellectual’s study (the book, the program), the audience’s favorite (the show), or the practitioner’s devotion (the service).

Such a combination of the real and surreal, conviction and showmanship, is no stranger to religious services nor to festivals.

This is certainly more fascinating and more enlightening than Madonna’s recent take, or rather, fake. Don’t you think?

- Bill Reichblum

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Interview: Stephanie Forryan

Wednesday, April 4th, 2007

Photo: Stephanie ForryanStephanie Forryan‘s career as a singer-songwriter has taken her from the folk stages of Northampton, Massachusetts to her current home in Berlin. Last year, she won first place in the first Troubadour Acoustic Song Contest. Since then, Stephanie has dedicated most of her time to working on her second album and exploring new directions for her musical compositions.

In this interview for KadmusArts, Stephanie talks about why and how she decided to become a musician. She also shares the stories of her initial breakthrough on the Berlin stage, and her visit to the Dream Festival in Rochester, Massachusetts.

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Community Culture

Monday, April 2nd, 2007


Photo by Mahmood Al-Yousif — Creative Commons License Some Rights Reserved

As we read your posts from around the world about the latest in festival work, artists, and audiences, we are often struck by the clear integration of culture and community. The more you go through KadmusArts, the more one can “hear” the sounds of communities coming to share stories, music, and dance together.

This kind of coming together is surely one of our most ancient and universal rituals. All societies and cultures have created a focal point for some kind of performance: to retell or create anew a group’s culture.

This week in Fest News we highlighted a culture-building initiative taking place online. Elham, a grass roots organization in Bahrain, provides a platform for talent and a forum for energizing creativity. (Bahrain is making its way on to our site, with the Bahrain International Music Festival as its first post.) Recently, Elham hosted an evening devoted to the role bloggers have in developing culture.

The story is playing out in Bahrain, on individual blogs, and via Global Voices. Global Voices’ mission

seeks to amplify, curate and aggregate the global conversation online - with a focus on countries and communities outside the U.S. and Western Europe. We are committed to developing tools, institutions and relationships that will help all voices everywhere to be heard.

In other words, this is a really cool site that you should make a point of checking out on a regular basis — and jump into.

Some of the really interesting approaches to the issue in Bahrain come from the introduction by Hisham Khalifa about the power of the individual and community to create culture outside of, if not in spite of, those in power.

The blogger Nido joins the conversation from a different angle. In looking through the identifiers on Facebook, Nido notes the ever-present self-tag as a moderate.

To Nido’s point, there hasn’t been a lot of revelatory, let alone long-lasting, art that has been created by moderates. Remove the absolute passion, inspired point-of-view, and determination to tell an urgent story and what do you have — certainly, not art.

As culture is the unfolding story of creation, so is the use of the online world to connect and build communities for “hearing” these stories.

Take a moment to absorb this: no matter where you are reading this, you are now part of the community, and the developing story, in Bahrain.

What’s your role?

- Bill Reichblum

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